Voter Turnout in Portugal: diagnosis and possible solutions

We have now the most well prepared and educated generations we have ever had. We have achieved the best education and health indicators in our history: never before in Portugal have so many people achieved secondary and higher education; the Portuguese have reached the highest life expectancy ever. Indicators for quality of life are the best ever. GDP per capita, despite the recession at the beginning of the decade, is at its highest level.

And yet, voter turnout has been steadily rising for twenty years. Between 1995 and 2015, it dropped by 500,000 votes, in legislative elections (in the same period, the five largest political parties have lost 800,000 votes). In presidential elections, for instance, voter turnout dropped by one million votes, between 1996 and 2016.

Huge gains in social welfare have coincided with a significant increase in abstention.

Why? How? Is this a Portuguese phenomenon or part of a trend of Western democracies? Is democracy a victim of its own success? What is the meaning of not voting: alienation and indifference? Or is it a silent protest language? Why won’t young people vote? What social, economic and territorial inequalities may influence electoral participation? What implications can different methods of measuring voter turnout have on our perception of electoral participation? How can the dynamics of emigration affect the official values of participation rates?

New general elections (2019), European elections (2019) and presidential elections (2021) are approaching. Can a healthy democracy co-exist with declining electoral participation? Is this a reversible phenomenon? Will there be any changes in the political and electoral system capable of mobilizing more electoral participation? Do we have an administration of the electoral process that fights abstention more effectively? What examples of political reforms in other countries have had a positive impact on voter turnout? Should direct democracy (e.g., referendum) be promoted to lighten the weight of representative democracy? Should voting be mandatory? Is voting a civic duty or a legal duty? What is the meaning of a full citizenship experience? And what is the role of new technologies and social networks in the exercise of voting?

With no definitive solutions and with a natural plurality of points of view, this is a debate that should summon the Portuguese society. This is our democracy. This is our future!

Program

09:00

Opening

Miguel Pinto Luz (Strategic Council | PT Talks) and Isabel Oneto (Deputy Secretary of State and Internal Administration)

09:35

Introduction to the topic

Nuno Garoupa

09:50

Keynote, Andre Blais
Chair: Nuno Garoupa

10:50

Coffee Break

11:10

Characterization of Turnout in Portugal

João Cancela

11:30

First Session: Framing the Questions about Turnout. Chair: Pedro Magalhães

Pedro Vicente, Susan Banducci, Pedro Riera

13:15

Lunch

14:15

Second Session: The Right and Duty to Vote,
Chair: Catarina Santos Botelho

Jorge Pereira da Silva, Mariana Lopes da Fonseca, Andreia Sofia Pinto de Oliveira

16:00

Coffee Break

16:15

Third Session: The Electoral System and Voter Turnout. Chair: Marina Costa Lobo

Jean-Benoit Pilet, Manuel Meirinho Martins, Joana Azevedo

18:05

Closing by the official entities

Carlos Carreiras (Mayor of Cascais) and Eduardo Ferro Rodrigues (President of the Assembly of the Republic)

Program of the Conference

Get a printable version of the Conference Program.

Speakers

Experts and academics and why we should listen to them.

Pedro
Riera

Professor

Jean-Benoit
Pilet

Political Sciences Professor

Manuel
Meirinho Martins

Political Science Professor

Pedro
C. Vicente

Professor; Researcher

André
Blais

Political Sciences Professor

Joana
Azevedo

Professor and Researcher

Mariana
Lopes da Fonseca

Research Fellow

Pedro
Magalhães

Political Scientist; Researcher

Andreia Sofia
Pinto Oliveira

Assistant Professor

João
Cancela

Researcher and Lecturer

Marina
Costa Lobo

Political Scientist; Researcher

Susan
Banducci

Professor; Researcher

Catarina
Santos Botelho

Professor; Researcher

Jorge
Pereira da Silva

Dean - Lisbon Law School ,UCP

Nuno
Garoupa

Professor of Law

Scientific Commission

The experts behind the concept paper, the outlining of the program and the organization of the working group.

Nuno Garoupa

A professor for almost twenty years, he is a professor of Law at George Mason University Antonin Scalia School of Law as of September 2018. Between 2014 and 2016 he was President of the Francisco Manuel dos Santos Foundation.

Catarina Botelho

Is an assistant professor at the Universidade Católica Portuguesa (UCP), in Oporto, where she coordinates and teaches several undergraduate, master's and doctoral courses. She has been a member of scientific and executive councils at dozens of national and international conferences and has authored numerous national and international publications.

Marina Costa Lobo

Is a Political Scientist at the Institute of Social Sciences of the University of Lisbon and expert in comparative political institutions and electoral behavior. Since 2002 that she is involved in an ongoing project which fields surveys on all major Portuguese Elections.

Pedro Magalhães

Is a researcher at the Institute of Social Sciences of the University of Lisbon and, between 2014 and 2017, he was research director at the Francisco Manuel dos Santos Foundation. Currently, he is the director of the consortium PASSDA- Production and Archive of Social Science Data.

Timeline

Jan 24, 2016

Presidential Election 2016

In the 2016 presidential election, which was won by Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa in the first round (52% of the valid votes), the turnout was below 50% of registered voters. It was the first time this happened in a presidential election in which the incumbent could not run.

Before and after the election, several analysts suggested that the widespread conviction that Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa would win the election contributed to the weak turnout rate.

Oct 4, 2015

Parliamentary Election 2015

The 2015 legislative elections had the lowest official participation rate of all the elections to the Assembly of the Republic already held. As noted in Expresso edition of 10 October 2015, the rate of registered abstention was five times higher than that of the Constituent Assembly.

While in previous years the main reservations regarding the magnitude of the evolution of abstention were mainly related to the outdated electoral rolls and the inclusion of deceased “voters”, several experts pointed out the potential impact of increased levels of emigration.

Jun 5, 2011

Parliamentary Election 2011

Following the resignation of José Sócrates in the midst of the Portuguese sovereign debt crisis, the 2011 elections led to the return to power of PSD and CDS, which together obtained a majority of deputies.

Following a further decline in the turnout rate, several actors – including the President of the Republic – called for a revision of the electoral rolls to reflect demographic and migratory dynamics, thus bringing the “official” turnout closer to the “real values”.

Jan 23, 2011

Presidential Election 2011

Cavaco Silva’s re-election (with 53% of valid votes) had the lowest official turnout rate among presidential elections since democratization.

The proportion of void and blank votes reached 6.2%, which was the highest value ever recorded in Portuguese electoral history.

Sept 27, 2009

Parliamentary Election 2009

This was the first election to the Assembly of the Republic after the changes introduced to the voter registration model, which became associated with the registration in the national identification file. On the one hand this change generated the expectation that in the medium term the number of “real voters” would be reached, on the other hand the automatic registration of voters was considered as a potential catalyst for the rate of abstention. In practice, there has been an increase in abstention rates throughout the territory, but especially in the centre

Jan 22, 2006

Presidential Election 2006

The turnout rate of the 2006 presidential election was higher than in the 2001 election, as has been the norm when the incumbent cannot run for re-election.

In the context of a high number of candidates from the left, preventing voters from this political space to abstain was seen as crucial to avoid a victory by Cavaco Silva in the first round. However, the 50.5% of votes earned by the candidate supported by the PSD and the CDS were enough to avoid a second round.

Feb 20, 2005

Parliamentary Election 2005

Following the dissolution of the Assembly of the Republic by Jorge Sampaio and the convening of legislative elections, the turnout rate raised for the first time since 1980.

In order to reduce abstention, the increase of participation in the Porto Metropolitan Area and in the Alentejo region was particularly important.

The PS obtained its first absolute majority with 45% of the votes and 121 (out of 230) mandates.

March 17, 2002

Parliamentary Election 2002

Following the resignation of António Guterres after a poor result in the 2001 municipal elections, the 2002 elections resulted in a governmental coalition between PSD and CDS-PP, which united efforts for the first time since the Democratic Alliance led by Sá Carneiro.

According to the analysis of the results published in thenewspaper Público in March 18, 2002, the high abstention was “a sign of a bad electoral campaign, and of leaders without the charisma of previous times.”

Jan 14, 2001

Presidential Election 2001

In a context in which the re-election of Jorge Sampaio was understood early on as highly likely, the 50% abstention threshold was for the first time reached in elections for the Presidency of Republic. The expansion of the universe of voters contributed to this, as Portuguese living abroad were now able to vote for this election. In this election, only 8.3% of voters registered abroad exercised their right to vote.

Oct 10, 1999

Parliamentary Election 1999

Before the elections to the Assembly of the Republic of 1999, there was a “cleaning” of the electoral rolls in order to purge the voters who had already died and but who were still included in the database; this was the first (and only) election in which the actual number of registered electors dropped vis-à-vis the previous election, with 42,000 fewer registered voters than in 1995. However, this did not prevent the abstention rate from increasing by five percentage points.

In the aftermath of the elections, the high levels of abstention were considered to be one of the reasons why the PS fell short of an absolute majority.

Jan 14, 1996

Presidential Election 1996

In the dispute for the succession to Mário Soares, Jorge Sampaio defeated Cavaco Silva. In this election there was a participation rate almost identical to that of the elections to the Assembly of the Republic that had taken place three months earlier.

Oct 1, 1995

Parliamentary Election 1995

The 1995 elections marked the end of the PSD wining cycle, as the PS led by António Guterres obtaining a plurality of votes (43.8%) and mandates (112 in 230).

Increasing abstention was beginning to be viewed with some concern, particularly among the younger segments of the population. According to the edition of the newspaper Expresso of September 23, 1995, young people – some of them already born in democracy – were the ones who abstained the most, and many of them were not even registered to vote. The difficulties associated with the process of registration were noted as being one of the reasons behind low levels of youth participation.

Oct 6, 1991

Parliamentary Election 1991

In the elections that led to the second absolute majority for the PSD led by Cavaco Silva, the complete demise of the PRD and the election of a deputy by the newly founded National Solidarity Party are other aspects bearing mention.

The PCP was the main victim of declining turnout, as it affected particularly its strongholds. (Freire 2000).

Jan 13, 1991

Presidential Election 1991

In a context markedly different from that of the previous presidential election, the re-election of Mário Soares was given as a fait accompli from the outset, as he managed to gather the support of the PSD leadership of Cavaco Silva . This contributed not only to Soares’ great advantage (70% of valid votes), but also to a decrease in electoral participation compared to 1986.

Jul 19, 1987

Parliamentary Election 1987

These legislative elections resulted in the first of two absolute majorities of the PSD led by Cavaco Silva. For the first time a party obtained more than half of the votes cast, as the abstention kept climbing. The first election of Portuguese deputies to the European Parliament was conducted simultaneously.

Regarding the geographic distribution of abstention, it increased moderately in some areas of the Alentejo which had presented until then some of the highest levels of participation in the country.

Journalistic accounts emphasised the increasing importance of a specific category of electors: the undecided. According to some of the analyses published at the time, the increase in abstention could be partially explained as the increase of preponderance of this group. The fact that the election took place in July, during summer holidays, generated reinforced appeals to mobilization.

Feb 16, 1986

Presidential Election 1986 (2nd turn)

One of the fundamental dimensions in Mário Soares’s candidacy was appealing to voters of other left-wing so that they did not abstain, thus being able to gather the election support needed to defeat Freitas do Amaral to be defeated. This actually happened, and Soares obtained 51.2% against 48.8% of the valid votes.

Although turnout rates in both rounds were lower than those of the previous presidential election, they were still higher than in previous and subsequent legislative elections.

Jan 26, 1986

Presidential Election 1986 (1st turn)

This has been the only presidential election in which a second round was necessary. The plurality of candidacies – especially on the left – to an intense and highly contested campaign help to explain this outcome.

One of the main vectors of the campaign and the media coverage was the attempt to mobilize and influence the abstainers of the previous legislative election.

Oct 5, 1985

Parliamentary Election 1985

In the context of a relatively stable party system, at least regarding composition of Parliament, the 1985 parliamentary elections were marked by the abrupt emergence of a new party: the PRD, promoted by Ramalho Eanes, at the time still the President of the Republic.

The turnout rate fell by three percentage points in this election. Although in a residual way, this was also a consequence of the increase of electoral boycotts, mainly in rural parishes. A clear example is that of Canedo, in the municipality of Ribeira de Pena, where none of 719 registered voters of the parish voted. For the first time, the entire population of a parish abstained from voting in an election to the Assembly of the Republic as a form of protest.

April 25, 1983

Parliamentary Election 1983

These were the first elections to the Assembly of the Republic after the constitutional revision of 1982, which brought important changes to the architecture of the Portuguese political system. There was a significant fall in the proportion of voters among the census, which fell for the first time below 80%. One of the interpretations for this significant decline is that after the cycle of intense popular mobilization in the founding phase of Portuguese democracy, these were now years of discontent with the economic situation that resulted in a progressive alienation of the citizens from the different forces policies (Espírito Santo 2015).

The elections resulted in an innovative outcome: the leadership of the AD was followed by the so-called “central bloc” government, which brought together Mário Soares’ PS and the PSD led by Mota Pinto and Rui Machete after the latter’s resignation.

Dec 7, 1980

Presidential Election 1980

In the 1980 presidential election, Ramalho Eanes faced opposition from Soares Carneiro, a candidate supported by the AD right-wing majority.

This has been the only presidential election so far in which the incumbent ran and the participation rate has risen vis-à-vis the previous election. This was fuelled by the perception of a more competitive dispute, evidenced by the narrow margin of victory of Ramalho Eanes, as well as the commotion caused by the death of Francisco Sá Carneiro three days before election day.

Oct 5, 1980

Parliamentary Election 1980

In 1980, the AD reinforced its voting (44.9%) and its parliamentary dominance, which became an absolute majority by the minimum margin (126 mandates out of 250).

The participation rate rose very slightly compared to the previous year’s elections, mainly due to the reduction of abstention in the Porto district (Belchior 2015); since then, the participation rate in parliamentary elections would not exceed 80%.

Dec 2, 1979

Parliamentary Election 1979

A sequence of governments initiated by the president preceded the legislative elections of 1979. PPD-PSD, CDS and PPM, which ran as the “Democratic Alliance” (AD), obtained a relative majority of votes (42.5%) and mandates (121 out of 250). This allowed the beginning of a cycle of right-wing government led by Sá Carneiro.

Despite some predictions that the population would be more disconnected from politics than in the years immediately following the revolution, the voter turnout rate remained above 80%. The press considered that the turnout was the product of the dramatization and the polarization of the campaign, the pleas of the Catholic Church and the mild weather that was felt, even though the election was held in December.

For the first time, the number of voters exceeded six million. The levels of participation dropped significantly in the emigration circles.

Jun 27, 1976

Presidential Election 1976

In the first presidential election of Portuguese democracy, Ramalho Eanes was supported by the main parties with parliamentary seats, with the exception of the PCP, and obtained 61.6% of the votes. The other candidates were Otelo Saraiva Carvalho (16.5%), Pinheiro de Azevedo (14.4%) and Octávio Pato (7.6%).

Approximately a quarter of those registered did not cast a vote. The explanations proposed at the time included the low competitiveness of the election, as the victory of Ramalho Eanes was considered from the start as highly likely. On the other hand, it was also noted the concentration of elections in a short time and the fact that the election took place at the end of June could have depressed turnout.

The political implications of increased abstention were the subject of a heated debate, as some commentators suggested that it could lead to the new President of the Republic having a lower level of legitimacy.

April 25, 1976

Parliamentary Election 1976

On April 25, 1976, the first MPs to the Assembly of the Republic, the representative body established by the recently approved constitution, were elected. Compared to the results of the election a year earlier, which had defined the composition of the Constituent Assembly, the parties that grew the most were the CDS (which more than doubled its vote share) and the PCP, at the expense of the PS and PPD.

In the edition of the weekly newspaper Expresso prior to the elections, it was hypothesised that the rain would deter some voters. In the following edition, the decline in the participation rate of about 8 percentage points was interpreted as a consequence of lower levels of “euphoria” among the population. Geographical asymmetries in the distribution of abstention also began to be spotted, as the high levels of participation in the Oporto area contrasted to those of the Azores islands.

April 25, 1975

Constituent Assembly Election

In the first free and fully inclusive election ever held in Portugal, the turnout rate was massive (91.7%). This was interpreted as a sign of clear popular support towards the new democratic regime. The turnout rate was the highest ever recorded of all elections held in the country.

The elections were held after an intense mobilization effort, promoted not only by political parties and institutions, but also by the military, the press, the church and various sectors of Portuguese society. Complex operations aimed at fully registering the population took place within a short timespan.

The most voted political party was the Socialist Party (PS), which obtained 37.9% of the votes. The remaining seats in the assembly were held by the PPD (26.4%), the PCP (12.5%), the CDS (7.6%), the MDP (4.1%), the UDP (0.8%) and the Association for the Defense of Interests of Macau (0.03%).

Speakers

Pedro Riera

Location

University Carlos III of Madrid

Occupation

Associate Professor at the Department of Social Sciences

Field of expertise

Political Sciences

Speakers

Joana Azevedo

Location

Instituto Universitário de Lisboa, ISCTE-IUL, in Lisbon

Occupation

Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at ISCTE-IUL (Instituto Universitário de Lisboa), in Lisbon and Integrated Researcher of CIES-IUL (Center for Research and Sociology Studies), in the areas of Inequalities, Migration and Territories.

Fields of Expertise

Sociology; Social Research and Theory; Data Analysis in Social Sciences

Joana Azevedo is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at ISCTE-IUL (Instituto Universitário de Lisboa), in Lisbon and an Integrated Researcher at CIES-IUL (Center for Research and Sociology Studies) in the areas of Inequalities, Migration and Territories.
Joana Azevedo has a PhD. in Social Theory and Research and is a Postgraduate in Data Analysis in Social Sciences from Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza and the ISCTE-IUL, respectively.
She has participated in several research projects and is currently researching the ‘Support and Opposition to Immigration in Portugal in a Comparative Perspective’, to be finished in 2019, which seeks to assess the politicization of immigration and integration issues in Portugal. She is the author of several publications, including, amongst others, in the ‘Journal of Contemporary European Studies’.

Webography:
https://ciencia.iscte-iul.pt/authors/joana-fonseca-franca-azevedo/cv

Speakers

Manuel Meirinho Martins

Location

Instituto Superior de Ciências Sociais e Políticas da Universidade de Lisboa (ISCSP)

Occupation

Political Science Professor

Field of expertise

Political Science

Manuel Meirinho Martins is a Professor (with tenure) at Instituto Superior de Ciências Sociais e Políticas da Universidade de Lisboa (ISCSP), where he concluded his Social Communication undergraduate studies (1987), his Masters in Political Science (1996) and his PhD in Political Science (2003). He teaches the courses of Political Science

He teaches Political Science in the following disciplines: Political Representation and Electoral Systems; Citizenship and Political Participation; Laboratory I – Analysis of Internal Policy (I Cycle); Intensive Seminar (II Cycle); Portuguese Political Process (III Cycle); Communication and Political Systems (Post-Graduation in Political Communication and Marketing).

Develops and collaborates in research projects in the areas of Political Participation; Political Representation; Electoral Systems, Political Communication.
Currently is the President of the ISCSP, Coordinator of the Post-Graduation in Political Communication and Marketing and Member of the Scientific Council of ISCSP.

Webography:
http://www.iscsp.ulisboa.pt/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=228:manuel-meirinho&catid=148:catedraticos&Itemid=267

Speakers

André Blais

Location

Canadá

Occupation

Professor

Fields of expertise

Voting behavior and electoral systems

André Blais is a professor in the Department of Political Sciences at the University of Montreal, Canada, where he is also the University Research Chair in Electoral Studies.
He is an elected fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and a research fellow with the CSDC – Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, the CIREQ – Centre Interuniversitaire de Recherche en Économie Quantitative and the CIRANO – Center for Interuniversity Research Analysis on Organizations.
He is the former President of the Canadian Political Science Association and former Chair of the CSES – Comparative Study of Electoral Systems. André Blais has received three Major Collaborative Research Initiative grants from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. The most recent of these grants funded a $2.5 million project entitled ‘Making Electoral Democracy Work’, with economists, political scientists and psychologists from Canada, Europe and the United States, on the impact of electoral systems on the behavior of voters and political parties.

Professor Blais has published 19 books, 8 edited volumes, 186 journal articles, and 103 chapters in edited volumes and has published in over 80 different scientific journals.

Webography: http://www.chairelectoral.com/director.html

Oradores

Andreia Sofia Pinto Oliveira

Location

Law School at the Universidade do Minho, Portugal

Occupation

Assistant Professor Law School at the Universidade do Minho ; Director of the Master in Human Rights of the Law School – University Minho since 2011

Public Law, Human Rights, Researcher

Direito Público, Direitos Humanos, Investigação.

Andreia Sofia Pinto Oliveira graduated from the Faculdade de Direito da Universidade Coimbra in 1997 and defended her PhD in Public Law at the Universidade Nova de Lisboa en 2006. The PhD thesis focused on the right to asylum as a fundamental right in the Portuguese Constitution and was published in 2009 – O Direito de Asilo na Constituição Portuguesa – Âmbito de Protecção de um Direito Fundamental, Coimbra, Coimbra Editora, 2009 (384 pages). Currently is Assistant Professor in the Law School at the Universidade do Minho.

Between 2010 and 2011 worked as UNHCR (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees) Consultant in Portugal for the purposes of the Further Developing Asylum Quality Project in Europe.

In 1999 and 2000, worked as Visiting Researcher at the Forschungszentrum für internationales und europäisches Ausländer- und Asylrecht, in Konstanz, Germany, and at the Max-Planck Institut für ausländisches öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht, in Heidelberg, Germany.

Webography:
http://www.jusgov.uminho.pt/investigadores/andreia-oliveira/

Speakers

Catarina Santos Botelho

Location

Portugal

Occupation

Professor; Researcher

Áreas de especialidade

Law; Legal and political sciences

Catarina Santos Botelho is an assistant professor at the Universidade Católica Portuguesa (UCP), in Oporto. She coordinates and teaches several undergraduate, master’s and doctoral courses, in addition to being the coordinator of the Mobility and International Relations of the course of Law. She has also taught in a number of foreign universities, postgraduate studies, master’s and doctoral degrees in Italy, Brazil or Spain.
She is a researcher at the Catholic Research Center for the Future of Law and a member of the Coordination Council of the Academic Network on the European Social Charter and Social Rights (ANESC), where she coordinates the Observatory for the Protection of Social Rights in the European Context, as well as being a member of the International Society of Public Law.
Catarina Santos Botelho graduated in 2004 from the Oporto Law School of the Universidade Católica Portuguesa, receiving the Prof. Doutor Francisco Carvalho Guerra award, attributed to the best final grade in Law. She has a Master’s (2009) and a PhD (2015) in legal-political sciences from UCP-Porto. In 2012, she was a guest researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, in Heidelberg, Germany, and in 2005 she took an internship at the Court of Justice of the European Union, in the office of the Advocate General Prof. Doctor Miguel Poiares Maduro.
She has been a member of scientific and executive councils at dozens of national and international conferences and has authored numerous national and international publications in addition to being a Member of the Editorial Board of the ‘Católica Law Review’ and ‘Arquivo Jurídico’ (Brazil) and a reviewer of the ‘Revista de Direito Administrativo’ (Getúlio Vargas Foundation-Rio, Brazil).

Oradores

Jean-Benoit Pilet

Location

Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB)

Occupation

Political Sciences Professor and President of Political Sciences Department at Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB); : Political Sciences researcher

Field of expertise

Political Sciences

Jean-Benoit Pilet is a professor of political science at Université libre de Bruxelles. His work focuses on electoral systems, electoral reforms, democratic reforms, elections, West European politics and party politics. He is the co-author of “Faces on the ballot – The personalization of electoral systems in Europe” (2016, Oxford University Press, with Alan Renwick) and of “The Politics of Party Leadership” (2016, Oxford University Press, with William Cross). He has also published several articles in journals such as European Journal of Political Research, Representation, West European Politics, Party Politics, and Electoral Studies. In recent years, he has also coordinated the large project Electoral System Changes in Europe (ESCE) that covers all electoral system changes at national level in Europe between 1945 and 2015 (see http://electoralsystemchanges.eu/Public/TextPage.php?ID=5). And he is now starting a new project on how citizens evaluate democratic innovations. This project, named “Cure Or Curse” has recently obtained a consolidator grant from the European Research Council (ERC).

Webography:
https://www.ulb.ac.be/rech/inventaire/chercheurs/1/CH8831.html

Speakers

João Cancela

Location

Portugal

Occupation

Researcher and lecturer

Fields of expertise

Political Science; Political participation; Electoral systems; Political behavior and public opinion; Political parties.

João Cancela is concluding his PhD in Political Science at NOVA University of Lisbon (FCSH-UNL), where he works as a teaching assistant and researcher at the Portuguese Institute of International Relations (IPRI-NOVA). He also works as an invited lecturer in the School of Economics and Business of the University of Minho, where he has taught various courses in the field of political science.

Over recent years, he has participated in a wide range of research projects. Currently, he participates in the project “Varieties of Democracy” (University of Gothenburg and University of Notre Dame) and in its Regional Center for Southern Europe, established at FCSH-UNL and coordinated by Tiago Fernandes. He is also part of the team of the project “Crisis, Political Representation and Democratic Renewal: The Portuguese case in the Southern European contexto”, coordinated by Marco Lisi (FCSH-UNL), and André Freire and Emmanouil Tsatsanis (ISCTE-IUL). Between 2015 and 2016 he was a visiting doctoral researcher at the University of Siena, in Italy. Prior to that he worked in the research office of the Portuguese High Commissioner for Immigration and Intercultural Dialogue.

Among his most recent publications about political participation and related topics are:
João Cancela (2017). “Eleições: Quadros institucionais e dinâmicas de participação” In Tiago Fernandes (coord.), Variedades de Democracia na Europa do Sul, 1968-2016: uma Comparação entre Espanha, França, Grécia, Itália e Portugal, Lisboa: Imprensa de Ciências Sociais. (link)

Marco Lisi and João Cancela (2017), “Types of party members and their implications: results from a survey of Portuguese party members”, Party Politics, (online first).

João Cancela, António Luís Dias and Marco Lisi (2017). “The impact of endorsements in intra-party elections: evidence from open primaries in a new Portuguese party”, Politics, Vol 37, Issue 2, pp. 167 – 183. (link)

João Cancela and Benny Geys (2016). “Explaining Voter Turnout: A Meta-Analysis of National and Subnational Elections”, Electoral Studies 42, 264–275. (link)

Tiago Fernandes, João Cancela, Michael Coppedge, Staffan I. Lindberg and Allen Hicken (2015). “Measuring Political Participation in Southern Europe: The Varieties of Democracy Approach”. Varieties of Democracy Institute: Working Paper No. 15.  (link)

Speakers

Jorge Pereira da Silva

Location

Lisbon Law School of the Universidade Católica Portuguesa

Occupation

Dean of the Lisbon Law School of the Universidade Católica Portuguesa

Field of expertise

Constitutional Law, Fundamental Rights and Political Theory

Jorge Pereira da Silva is currently the Dean of the Lisbon Law School of the Universidade Católica Portuguesa, where he concluded his Law undergraduate studies (1993), his Masters (2002) and his Ph.D. (2014).
Professor Jorge researches primarily in the areas of Public Law and teaches the courses of Constitutional Law, Fundamental Rights and Political Theory.
He has been a Visiting Professor at the Institute of Political Studies of the Universidade Católica and at the Institute of Higher Military Studies.
Professor Jorge also serves as Deputy Advisor for the Representative of the Republic to the Autonomous Region of Azores and is a private legal consultant.
Among his publications, one can highlight the books about “judicial protection against legislative omissions” (2003), “citizenship rights and the right to citizenship” (2004) and most recently “state’s obligations to protect fundamental rights” (2015).

 

Webografia:

http://www.fd.lisboa.ucp.pt/resources/documents/CVs_CORPO_DOCENTE/CVJorgePereiraSilva.pdf

Speakers

Mariana Lopes da Fonseca

Location

Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance, Germany

Occupation

Senior Research Fellow at Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance

Field of expertise

Politic Economy, Public Economy Sector.

Mariana Lopes da Fonseca is a Senior Research Fellow at Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance since 2016.

Her main area of research is where the politic economy and the public economy intersects. In fact, some of her recent studies have a commitment to identify the impact of financing reforms or the local organizations in their finances and municipal elections.

She has several articles published in highly renowned scientific magazines like the American Journal of Political Science and the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization.

Mariana, have always been passionate about economics. After graduating in Economics from NOVA School of Business and Economics (2010) she concluded her master degreed at the same university in the same area – Economics. She then flew to Rome, Italy, and took another master degreed at LUISS Guido Carli University in Economics and Finance. Her PhD in public economics earned the highest distinction at The University of Göttingen in Germany with her thesis about “The Political Economy of Electoral Reforms: A Tale of Two Countries”(2016).

In Portugal, she studied the introduction of the limit of mandates of mayors and their implications for local finance, as well as the electoral advantage of incumbents and their political parties before the introduction of the limit of mandates.

Webografia:
http://www.tax.mpg.de/en/public_economics/public_economics_people/dr_mariana_lopes_da_fonseca.html

Speakers

Marina Costa Lobo

Location

Portugal

Occupation

Political Scientist; Researcher

Fields of expertise

Political institutions; Electoral behavior

Marina Costa Lobo (PhD in Politics, Oxford University 2005, Habilitation in Politics, University of Lisbon 2011) is Principal Researcher at the Institute of Social Sciences of the University of Lisbon (ICS-UL) and vice-director of Instituto de Políticas Públicas (IPP). She is director of the Observatory of the Quality of Democracy at ICS-UL. Currently, she is Principal Investigator for the ERC Consolidator Project “MAPLE”, which researches the politicisation of Europe before and after the Eurozone crisis. She was one of the founding directors of the Portuguese Election Studies. Her research interests include the role of leaders in electoral behaviour, economic voting, political parties and institutions. She has published extensively on these topics in journals and books. Her latest book was co-edited with John Curtice and is entitled: Personality Politics: Leaders and Democratic Elections, Oxford University Press (2015).

Webografia:
https://www.ics.ulisboa.pt/pessoa/marina-costa-lobo

http://marinacostalobo.pt/

Oradores

Nuno Garoupa

Location

EUA

Occupation

Professor of Law

Fields of expertise

Comparative Law; Law and Economics; Comparative Judicial Politics

Nuno Garoupa is a professor of Law at George Mason University Antonin Scalia School of Law as of September 2018. Before that, he was a professor of Law at Texas A&M University School  of Law, for the last three years, and President of the Francisco Manuel dos Santos Foundation (FFMS) in Lisbon, Portugal, between 2014 and 2016.
His professional career started in 1998, at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra, followed by the  Universidade Nova de Lisboa, the University of Manchester School of Law and the University of Illinois College of Law. Nuno Garoupa was also responsible for the Chair in Research Innovation, Catholic Global School of Law, between 2015 and 2018 and was the winner of the Spanish prize Julián Marías in 2010.
He has more than one hundred publications in international journals in the area of Law and Economics and is the author of ‘The Government of Justice’ (FFMS e Relógio d’Água, 2011),  ‘Judicial Reputation: A Comparative Theory’, with Tom Ginsburg (University of Chicago Press,
2015) and ‘Legal Origins and the Efficiency Dilemma’, with Carlos Gómez Ligüerre and Lela Mélon (Routledge, 2017).
Nuno Garoupa is also the current President of the Asociación Española de Derecho y Economia, elected for the term until 2020 and co-editor of the ‘International Review of Law and Economics’, since 2012.

Oradores

Pedro C. Vicente

Location

Portugal

Occupation

Professor; Researcher

Fields of expertise

Economics; Development economics; Political economy; Natural resource governance.

Pedro C. Vicente is an Associate Professor of Economics at Nova School of Business and Economics, where he is also the founding scientific director of NOVAFRICA – the Nova Africa Center for Business and Economic Development. Specializing in development economics and Africa, with a focus on political economy issues, he is currently working on community-driven development in Angola, incentives of community health workers in Guinea-Bissau, and natural resource governance in Mozambique.
His main line of research has been the design and implementation of large-scale field experiments, coupled with behavioral measurements, in the context of information campaigns. Many of these campaigns are related to elections and the mobilization of citizens for political participation.
In addition to being a visiting professor at the University of Notre Dame and consultant to the World Bank, Pedro Vicente was a professor and researcher at the University of Oxford and Trinity College Dublin. Currently, he is one of the lead academics at the International Growth Centre (IGC), a research affiliate at the Bureau for Research in Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD), a founding member of Evidence in Governance and Politics (EGAP), and a nonresident fellow at the Navarra Center for International Development.
Pedro Vicente has published in top economics journals such as the Review of Economics and Statistics, the Economic Journal, and the Journal of Development Economics, and serves as an Associate Editor of the Journal of African Economies. His research has been funded by national and international agencies such as DFID (Department for International Development), USAID (United States Agency for International Development), 3IE (International Initiative for Impact Evaluation), IZA (Institute for the Study of Labour), and FCT (Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia).
Pedro holds MA and PhD degrees in Economics from the University of Chicago, as well as an MSc in Economics from the London School of Economics.

Webografia: http://www.pedrovicente.org

Oradores

Pedro Magalhães

Location

Portugal

Occupation

Political Scientist; Researcher

Fields of expertise

Electoral Behavior; Social and political attitudes; Public opinion; Judicial and Constitutional Politics

Pedro Magalhães is a researcher at the Institute of Social Sciences of the University of Lisbon. His research interests focus on electoral behavior, social and political attitudes, public opinion, survey research and judicial and constitutional politics.
In 2003, he received his PhD from the Ohio State University, with a dissertation on judicial review and judicial behavior in Spain and Portugal. Between 1999 and 2009, Pedro Magalhães worked at CESOP – Centro de Estudos e Sondagens de Opinião – of the Portuguese Catholic University, which he directed between 2005 and 2009. Between 2014 and 2017, he was research director at the Francisco Manuel dos Santos Foundation.
Currently, Pedro Magalhães is the director of the consortium PASSDA- Production and Archive of Social Science Data, integrated in the Portuguese Roadmap of Research Infrastructures, involving twelve social science research centers. He is also a member of the Module 5 Planning Committee of CSES – Comparative Study of Electoral Systems and is, since November 2017, a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the European Social Survey.

Oradores

Susan Banducci

Location

UK

Occupation

Professor; Researcher

Fields of expertise

Comparative political behaviour; Media and political communication

Professor Susan Banducci is the director of the Exeter Q-Step Centre focused on advancing quantitative methods in the social sciences. Her research focuses on comparative electoral behavior and public opinion and addresses questions about inequalities in participation.
She is directing and a co-investigator on a series of funded projects that seek to understand news and information effects in the new media ecosystem. She has collaborated on international projects such as the New Zealand Election Study and the European Election Study, along with directing two EU Marie Curie funded early career researcher training networks [ELECDEM & VOTEADVICE].
Through her research, she has sought to strengthen the capacity for the use of and training in advanced social science methods, develop innovative approaches to the comparative study of elections that draw on computational social science techniques.

Webography: http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/politics/staff/banducci/

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